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Vision, Values & Mission

Does your church have a clear vision, values, and mission? Do you have on paper what you're really all about? Do you know what direction you're headed? Maybe you find all this talk of vision, values, and mission confusing? Here you can find out how to really focus on what God has for you and your church.


imageSaddleback Launches New Plan to Multiply Their Global Impact

Within the next three years, Saddleback Church aims to launch nine new off-site campuses in addition to its San Clemente campus, which meets every weekend at the local high school, and step up its global P.E.A.C.E. plan. By 2010, Saddleback hopes to see 10,000 more lives changed and baptized. That's just part of the plan recently released...

imageHow Deep is Your Vision? Larry Brey, the Assimilation Pastor at Elevation Church has a great post over at the Access:Elevation Blog last week on vision. Larry shares a few practical things that have been guiding them along the way as it pertains to vision:

More On Vision, Values & Mission
imageThe Three Most Important Factors in the Church:  Vision. Vision. Vision.

Craig Groeschel writes: "It is commonly said the three most important factors in real estate are: Location, Location, Location. Id argue that the three most important factors in a church (or business) are: Vision, Vision, Vision... imageThe Simply Worthless Sermon

Ever wanted to know how to ensure that the audience walks away with nothing after you preach?  Ever wanted to know without a doubt that you just wasted the last 45 minutes of their lives?  Ever looked for a flawless strategy to make your sermon worthless?  Well look no farther!  Here are 15 simple steps to guarantee that church members walk out of the church the exact same way they came in!

imageNew North Point Website Offers Administrative Docs for Free!

Andy Stanley's North Point Church now has a website that offers many of their church government, human resources, accounting, facilities, web and tech, and other resources online for free! According to the site, "Over the past ten years, we have brainstormed, strategized, tweaked, and modified our model. We have compiled much of our philosophy, strategy, practices, and processes on this site in an effort to help other churches learn from our experiences. We've included things like: why we do some of the things we do, what has worked well, and what hasn't worked well. We'll be the first to admit that we're not there yet! We hope you will find this site helpful as you create environments for people to connect meaningfully with God..." imageDietrich Bonhoeffer:  A Pastor Shouldn’t Complain About His Congregation”

Here's an interesting quote from Dietrich Bonhoeffer's book "Life Together". Take a read and let us know if you agree or disagree... "A pastor should not complain about his congregation, certainly never to other people, but also not to God. A congregation has not been entrusted to him in order that he should become its accuser before God and men..." imageWhy is the Average Sermon Less Interesting than Most Sitcoms?

Every day I get a couple of email newsletters about the television industry. I get only one weekly preaching-related newsletter, and I usually delete it without opening the email because I don't pay the monthly fee required to follow the links to the really good stuff. Hmmmmm....that makes it 2:1 in favor of television. And I'm a preacher myself. But I am also a TV viewer. And while I cannot produce survey research to prove it, I would bet my moldering paper files that most people find the average sitcom more interesting than the average sermon (my own included). I hear a lot of preaching that is true, but not engaging. In other words, the talk is clear, sincere, relates the Scripture accurately and even applies them to everyday life in very practical ways. It's just that nothing is touched in me beyond my understanding of the content. Maybe I'm unusual, but that's just not enough... imageSeven Possible Ways to Develop Your Church’s Vision

Professor Kevin Drury has an interesting discussion going on over at his blog. He is in the middle of teaching a class on church leadership, and he is teaching his students about the different ways that some pastors develop vision for their churches. Take a look at his list, and give some comments on each over at his blog to help him out.

Vision, Values & Mission Resources imagePastors In Transition: Why Clergy Leave Local Church Ministry

Why do pastors leave the ministry? Several common issues emerge from the research of Dean Hoge and Jacqueline Wenger: preference for another form of ministry, the need to care for children or family, conflict in the congregation, conflict with denominational leaders, burnout or discouragement, sexual misconduct, and divorce or marital problems. Of these factors, which form the basis for the central chapters of Pastors in Transition, two are especially important: conflict and a preference for specialized ministry. A close third is the experience of burnout, discouragement, stress and overwork. As the authors explore these factors, they provide significant insights into what can be done to help people stay in ministry. imageEat This Book: A Conversation in the Art of Spiritual Reading

The bestselling author of "The Message" challenges believers to read the Scriptures on their own terms, as God's revelation, and to live them as they read them. imagePracticing Greatness: 7 Disciplines of Extraordinary Spiritual Leaders

Based on his extensive experience as coach and mentor to many thousands of Christian leaders across a broad spectrum of ministry settings, Reggie McNeal helps spiritual leaders understand that they will self-select into or out of greatness. imageThe Missional Leader: Equipping Your Church to Reach a Changing World (by Alan Roxburgh)

This book gives church and denominational leaders, pastors, and clergy a clear model for leading the change necessary to create and foster a missional church focused outward to spread the message of the Gospel into the surrounding community.